Is This Really Life?

Death is one of the only two sure things in life, the other of course being taxes. As such, humans are obsessed with thwarting death, a feat which ever developing technology moves us closer to every day. But are we truly escaping death when we enlist the services of these machines or are we only preserving pale imprints of the past? The short film World of Tomorrow attempts to answer this question through its comically dark methods of achieving “immortality” and the surrealist imagery with which it paints its picture.

The first avenue for transcending death that is presents is said to be mainly for the incredibly affluent, and involves the transfer of memories into an exact biological clone with the fate of the original being left largely to the imagination. The key word in this described procedure is “memories”, not conscience, which implies that after the procedure is complete, the original host of these memories is either left a drooling, memoryless mess with the intention of being discarded, or even more chillingly, that the original host is left intact and is simply killed as it no longer holds the status of being a member of society. The alternative for members of the future’s middle class is possibly even worse with the implication that the space they download their conscience into inevitably becomes an inescapable digital cell that enforces an eternal stint of solitary confinement. The chilling nature of this option is that once all literature and cinema available has been consumed, the utter emptiness that the occupant is subjected to is today considered by many to be an extreme form of psychological torture. When faced with this option, execution seems to be a not only humane, but also a desirable outcome.

If these are the only options available, then we must ask ourselves are the members of this society truly cheating death, and is what is presented in the film something that can be considered life?

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